Ben qui si mostra il ciel (Cipriano de Rore)

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  • (Posted 2016-12-29)   CPDL #42438:         
Editor: James Gibb (submitted 2016-12-29).   Score information: A4, 2 pages, 49 kB   Copyright: CPDL
Edition notes: Reformatting of #11100, with corrections. MusicXML source file is in compressed .mxl format.
  • CPDL #11100:       
Editor: Brian Russell (submitted 2006-02-27).   Score information: A4, 5 pages, 34 kB   Copyright: Personal
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  • CPDL #07087:   
Editor: Rolf Maeder (submitted 2004-05-25).   Score information: Letter, 4 pages, 52 kB   Copyright: Personal
Edition notes: Previously hosted on external site. Uploaded to CPDL server 2007-11-24.

General Information

Title: Ben qui si mostra il ciel
Composer: Cipriano de Rore

Number of voices: 4vv   Voicing: SATB
Genre: SecularMadrigal

Language: Italian
Instruments: A cappella

First published: 1561 in Di Cipriano et Annibale madregali a 4 voci, no. 1

Description:

External websites:

Original text and translations

Italian.png Italian text

Ben qui si mostra il ciel vago e sereno,
E qui ridon le rose e i lieti fiori,
Spirando amanti odori,
Destan gli augelli a dolce canto ameno.
Ma ria ventur'al fin lasso, ne sorge,
Ch'Amor tacitamente
Tesse fra fiori e l'herbe un placido angue.
Onde venen, si dolce ai petti porge
Ch'il cor soavemente,
Pien di dolce desio morendo langue.

English.png English translation

Beautiful shows here the sky, vague and clear,
Here smile the roses, and the happy flowers,
Blowing loving smells
Wake the birds to a sweet pleasant singing.
But in the end bad luck arises,
Because Love, silently,
Waves with flowers and herbs a quiet snake.
To the breasts of whom comes he offers it gently
And the heart, sweetly,
Languishes, and dies filled with sweet desires.

Note: it is particularly difficult to translate the manifold meanings of Renaissance languages (Italian, in this case). Many of the repetitions that appear in the English translation are not present in the Italian original, which allows many more "nuances" to the various love expressions.