Harvest Hymn (Jeremiah Ingalls)

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  • (Posted 2017-08-19)   CPDL #45955:       
Editor: Barry Johnston (submitted 2017-08-19).   Score information: 7 x 10 inches (landscape), 1 page, 52 kB   Copyright: Public Domain
Edition notes: Four-part version; Counter part written by B. C. Johnston, 2017. Note shapes added (4-shape). All nine stanzas included, as in Ingalls 1805. MusicXML source file is in compressed .mxl format.
  • (Posted 2017-08-19)   CPDL #45954:       
Editor: Barry Johnston (submitted 2017-08-19).   Score information: Letter, 1 page, 44 kB   Copyright: Public Domain
Edition notes: Three-part version. Oval note edition. One small edit to the first ending, otherwise as written in 1805. All nine stanzas included, as in Ingalls 1805. MusicXML source file is in compressed .mxl format.
  • (Posted 2017-08-19)   CPDL #45953:   
Editor: Barry Johnston (submitted 2017-08-19).   Score information: 7 x 10 inches (landscape), 1 page, 44 kB   Copyright: Public Domain
Edition notes: Three-part version. Note shapes added (4-shape). All nine stanzas included, as in Ingalls 1805.

General Information

Title: Harvest Hymn
First Line: The fields are all white, the harvest is near
Composer: Jeremiah Ingalls
Lyricist: Anonymous

Number of voices: 3vv   Voicing: STB
Genre: Sacred   Meter: 10 11. 10 11

Language: English
Instruments: A cappella

Published: 1805 in Ingalls' The Christian Harmony, pp. 21-22, for three voices: Treble-Tenor-Bass.

Description: Words by an unknown author, apparently first published in Elias Smith, A Collection of Hymns for the Use of Christians, Boston, 1804.

External websites:

Original text and translations

English.png English text

Elias Smith, A Collection of Hymns, 1804

An harvest, or end of the world
1. The fields are all white, the harvest is near,
The angels all with their sharp sickles appear
To reap down the wheat and gather it in barns,
While the wild plants of nature are left for to burn.

2. Come then, O my soul, meditate on that day,
When all things in nature shall cease and decay;
When the trumpet shall sound, the angels appear
To reap down the earth, both the wheat and the tare.

3. But hear the sad cry ascend to the sky,
Of those in distress and have no where to fly;
They'll call for the rocks and mountains to fall
On their naked souls for to hide them withal.

4. But 'twill all be in vain, the mountains will flee,
The rocks fly like hailstones and shall no more be;
The earth it shall quake, the seas shall retire,
And the solid world then shall be all on fire.

5. But hear the great Judge in that dread alarm,
Saying, Gather my saints, bring them all to my arms,
That the seven last plagues may be poured out on those
Who have blasphemed my name, and my saints have opposed.

6. Then, O wretched sinners, look up and espy
The glorious Redeemer marching down the sky,
In a chariot of fire to the earth he is bound,
With a guard of bright angels attending him down.

7. Come hither, ye nations, your sentence receive,
No longer my Spirit shall strive and be grieved;
My sentence is right, my judgment is just,
Come hither, ye blest, but depart, all ye cursed.

8. O sinners, take warning, and seek ye the Lord,
1 have not been jesting, 'tis Jesus' own word,
That those who believe, in glory shall stand,
While all unbelievers are sure to be damned.

9. Now farewell, I leave you to ponder your way;
May the Lord seal instruction from what I now say;
That our souls to God's throne may be poured out in prayer,
That we may be prepared to meet Christ in the air.

 

Jeremiah Ingalls, Christian Harmony, 1805

Harvest Hymn
1. The fields are all white, the harvest is near,
The reapers all with their sharp sickles appear,
To reap down their wheat, and gather in barns,
While wild plants of nature are left for to burn.

2. Come then, O my soul and think on that day,
When all things in nature shall cease and decay;
The trumpet shall sound, the angels appear
To reap down the earth, both the wheat and the tare.

3. But hear the sad cry ascending the sky,
Of those in distress that have no where to fly;
They call for the rocks and mountains to fall,
Upon their poor souls, for to hide them from thrall.

4. 'Twill all be in vain, the mountains must flee,
The rocks fly like hailstones, and shall no more be;
The earth it shall shake, the seas shall retire,
And this solid world will then be all on fire.

5. Then, O wretched mortals, look up and spy.
The glorious Redeemer descending the sky,
On chariots of fire to earth he is bound,
With guards of bright angels attending him down.

6. But hear the kind Judge, that great day alarms,
First gather my children all into my arms.
That seven last plagues be poured out on those,
Who’ve blasphemed my name, and my saints have opposed.

7. Come hither ye tribes, your sentence receive,
No longer my spirit shall strive and be grieved,
My judgment is right, my sentence is just,
Come hither ye blest, but depart all ye cursed.

8. O! sinners take thought, and seek ye the Lord,
I have not been jesting, it is Christ’s own word,
That those who’ve done good in glory shall stand,
While those who’ve done evil shall surely be damned.

9. So farewell, I leave you, pondering your way,
The Lord seal instruction to what I now say,
Your souls to God’s throne be poured out in prayer.
That you be prepared to meet Christ in the air.

Meter of stanzas

(1) 10,11,10,12. (2) 11,11,11,11. (3) 10,12,10,11. (4) 10,11,10,11. (5) 10,12,12,12.
(6) 11,12,12,12. (7) 11,11,11,11. (8) 11,11,11,11. (9) 10,12,12,12.

(All) 10,11,10,11.