Fayrfax Manuscript

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The Fayrfax Manuscript (British Museum Add MS 5465) contains seven pieces by Robert Fayrfax, whose arms appear on the title page, as well as works of Browne, William Cornishe jr., Davy, Banastir, Newark, Sir Thomas Philipps, Sheryngham, Tutor, Turges, and a number of anonymous composers. It seems to have been compiled before Fayrfax received the title of Doctor in 1504, and a prayer for Prince Arthur (d. 1502) likewise dates it to around the turn of the century. A modern edition by John Stevens appears in Musica Britanica vol. 36, while the texts are given with their original spelling in his Music and Poetry in the Early Tudor Court.

Publication date and place: ca. 1500 – Manuscript.

Some of the more remarkable pieces are among the Passion carols nos. 29-36.

No. Title Composer Parts Notes
1. (i) The farther I go William Newark SA
2. (ii) Ah my heart, I know you well Anonymous SA
3. (iii) What causeth me woeful thoughtes William Newark SA
4. (iiii) So far I trow from remedy William Newark SA
5. (v) My woeful heart Sheryngham SA
6. (vj) Deemed wrongfully upper voice only
7. (xiii) O my desire William Newark
8. Let search your mindes eye Hamshere fragment of lower voice
9. Love fain would I
10. (xi) Now the law is led Rycardus Davy incomplete, Tenor voice only
11. (xii) That was my woe R. Fayrfax AT
12. (xiii) Benedicite! What dreamed I? Robert Fayrfax ATB attribution from title page
13. (xiii) To complain me, alas Robert Fayrfax ATB attribution from title page
14. (xv) Alas, it is I Turges (?) ATB attrib. to Faryfax on title page
15. I am he that hath you daily served Edmund Turges fragment
16. …I pray daily fragment
17. (xix) But why am I so abused? William Newarke
18. (xx) Your counterfeiting William Newarke
19. (xxi) Thus musing in my mind William Newarke
20. (xxii) Most clear of colour Roberd Fayrfax SAT
21. (xxiii) I love, loved, and loved would I be Roberd Fayrfax SAT
22. (xxiiii) Alas, for lack of her presence Roberd Fayrfax SAT
23. (xxv) That was my joy Anonymous TTB
24. (xxvi) Somewhat musing Robert Fayrfax ATB
25. (xxvii) Madame, defrain! Anonymous ATB
26. (xxviii) O root of truth Tutor SA, T "ad placitum"
27. (xxviiii) I love, and whom love ye? Syr Thomas Phelyppis SSA alludes to the birth of a prince
28. (xxx) Complain I may anon. SSA
29. (xxxi) Alone, alone Anonymous AAT
30. (xxxii) Ah my dear, ah, my dear son Anonymous AAT
31. (xxxiii) Jesu, mercy, how may this be Browne SATB
32. (xxxiiii) Afraid, alas and why so suddenly? Anonymous SATB
33. (xxxv) Woefully arrayed William Cornysh Junior SATB
34. (xxxvi) Ah, gentle Jesu Sheryngham ATTB
35. (xxxvii) Woefully arrayed Browne SAT
36. (xxxviii) My fearful dream Gilbert Banastir ATB
37. (xxxix) Ah, blessed Jesu Richard Dauy SAT
38. (xl) Ah mine heart, remember thee well Richard Dauy SAT
39. (xli) Margaret meek Browne SAT
40. (xlii) Joan is sick and ill at ease Rychard Dauy SSA
41. (xliii) Ay, besherew you! William Cornysh Junior SAT
42. (xliiii) Who shall have my fair lady? SSA
43. (xlv) Hoyda, hoyda, jolly rutterkin William Cornysh Junior TTB
44. (xlvi) From stormy windes Edmund Turges ATT dated 1501, a prayer for Henry VII's son Arthur
45. (xlvii) This day day daws Anonymous SAB
46. (xlviii) Small pathes to the greenwood Anonymous ATB
47. (xlix) Enforce yourself as Goddes knight Edmund Turges SAT
48. (l) Be it known to all Anonymous TTB
49. (li) In a slumber late as I was Anonymous SAT Concordance in Drexel Manuscript NYPL 4180

External links