Where the columbines grow (A. J. Fynn)

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  • CPDL #30893:         
Editor: Matthew Frisk (submitted 2014-01-01).   Score information: Letter, 6 pages, 59 kB   Copyright: Public Domain
Edition notes: MusicXML source file is in compressed .mxl format.

General Information

Title: Where the columbines grow
Composer: A. J. Fynn
Lyricist: A. J. Fynn

Number of voices: 4vv   Voicing: SATB
Genre: SecularUnknown

Language: English
Instruments: Piano

First published: 1911

Description: "Where The Columbines Grow" is the official state song of the State of Colorado, USA (adopted 1915). Setting is for solo voice with piano accompaniment and optional SATB refrain tag.

External websites:

Original text and translations

English.png English text

Where the snowy peaks gleam in the moonlight,
Above the dark forests of pine,
And the wild foaming waters dash onward,
Toward lands where the tropic stars shine;
Where the scream of the bold mountain eagle
Responds to the notes of the dove
Is the purple robed West, the land that is best,
The pioneer land that we love.

Chorus
'Tis the land where the columbines grow,
Overlooking the plains far below,
While the cool summer breeze in the evergreen trees
Softly sings where the columbines grow.

The bison is gone from the upland,
The deer from the canyon has fled,
The home of the wolf is deserted,
The antelope moans for his dead,
The war whoop re-echoes no longer,
The Indian's only a name,
And the nymphs of the grove in their loneliness rove,
But the columbine blooms just the same.

Let the violet brighten the brookside,
In sunlight of earlier spring,
Let the fair clover bedeck the green meadow,
In days when the orioles sing,
Let the golden rod herald the autumn,
But, under the midsummer sky,
In its fair Western home, may the columbine bloom
Till our great mountain rivers run dry.