Difference between revisions of "As a decrepit father takes delight (Michael Gray)"

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(Original text and translations)
 
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==Original text and translations==
 
==Original text and translations==
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{{Text|English|
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As a decrepit father takes delight
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To see his active child do deeds of youth
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So I, made lame by Fortune's dearest spight
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Take all of my comfort of thy worth and truth.
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For whether beauty, birth, or wealth, or wit,
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Or any of these all, or all, or more
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Intitled in their parts, do crownéd sit,
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I make my love ingrafted to this store:
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So then I am not lame, poor, nor despis'd
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Whilst that this shadow doth such substance give
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That I in thy abundance am suffic'd,
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And by a part of all thy glory live:
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  Look what is best, that best I wish in thee,
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  This wish I have, then ten times happy me.}}
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''William Shakespeare (Sonnet XXXVII)''
  
 
[[Category:Sheet music]]
 
[[Category:Sheet music]]
 
[[Category:Modern music]]
 
[[Category:Modern music]]

Latest revision as of 04:18, 14 October 2019

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  • NewScore.gif  (Posted 2019-10-14)   CPDL #55606:   
Editor: Michael Gray (submitted 2019-10-14).   Score information: Letter (landscape), 6 pages, 190 kB   Copyright: CC BY NC ND
Edition notes:

General Information

Title: As a decrepit father takes delight
Composer: Michael Gray
Lyricist: William Shakespeare

Number of voices: 3vv   Voicing: SAB
Genre: SecularPartsong

Language: English
Instruments: Piano

First published: 2019

Description: Part of an on-going collection of SAB settings of Shakespeare's Sonnets

External websites: http://www.graymichael.com

Original text and translations

English.png English text

As a decrepit father takes delight
To see his active child do deeds of youth
So I, made lame by Fortune's dearest spight
Take all of my comfort of thy worth and truth.
For whether beauty, birth, or wealth, or wit,
Or any of these all, or all, or more
Intitled in their parts, do crownéd sit,
I make my love ingrafted to this store:
So then I am not lame, poor, nor despis'd
Whilst that this shadow doth such substance give
That I in thy abundance am suffic'd,
And by a part of all thy glory live:
  Look what is best, that best I wish in thee,
  This wish I have, then ten times happy me.

William Shakespeare (Sonnet XXXVII)