Et egressus est (Manuel Cardoso)

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  • CPDL #22213:     
Editor: John Hetland (submitted 2010-08-27).   Score information: Letter, 9 pages, 372 kB   Copyright: CPDL
Edition notes: Source: Portugaliae Musica, volume 13, Lisbon, 1965. We have raised the notation a tone and halved the time values. Translation, musica ficta and text underlay by John Hetland and The Renaissance Street Singers.

General Information

Title: Et egressus est
Composer: Manuel Cardoso

Number of voices: 6vv   Voicing: SSAATB
Genre: SacredMotetLamentation for Maundy Thursday

Language: Latin
Instruments: A cappella

First published:

Description: For the second lesson at Matins on Maundy Thursday (Lamentations 1:6-7)

External websites:

Original text and translations

Latin.png Latin text

VAU:
Et egressus est a filia Sion
Omnis decor ejus;
Facti sunt principes ejus velut arietes
Non invenientes pascua,
Et abierunt absque fortitudine
Ante faciem subsequentis.

ZAIN:
Recordata est Jerusalem
  dierum afflictionis suae,
Et praevaricationis,
Omnium desiderabilium suorum,
Quae habuerat a diebus antiquis,
Cum caderet populus ejus in manu hostili,
Et non esset auxiliator;
Viderunt eam hostes,
Et deriserunt sabbata ejus.

Jerusalem, Jerusalem,
  convertere ad Dominum Deum tuum.

English.png English translation

VAV (6):
And from the daughter of Zion has departed
All her beauty;
Her princes have become like rams
That find no pastures,
And they have fled without strength
Before the face of the pursuer.

ZAYIN (7):
Jerusalem remembered,
  in the days of her affliction
And wandering,
All her precious things
That she had from ancient days,
When her people fell into the hand of the foe,
And there was none to help her;
Enemies saw her
And derided her Sabbaths.*

Jerusalem, Jerusalem,
  turn to the Lord your God.

*While "derided her sabbaths" is a literal translation of the Vulgate Latin, the meaning of the Hebrew original is closer to "mocked at her inactivity," the state of non-functioning to which the city had been brought.