He's come, let every knee be bent (Joseph Stephenson)

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  • CPDL #22897:        (Sibelius 3)
Editor: Edmund Gooch (submitted 2010-12-21).   Score information: A4, 2 pages, 33 kB   Copyright: Public Domain
Edition notes: The alto part is printed in the alto clef in the source. The first verse only is underlaid in the source: the remaining verses of the text are printed afterwards, and have been underlaid editorially. The original time signature is a figure 2 alone.
MusicXML source file is in compressed .mxl format.

General Information

Title: He's come, let every knee be bent
Composer: Joseph Stephenson

Number of voices: 4vv   Voicing: SATB
Genre: SacredHymn   Meter: 88. 88 (L.M.)

Language: English
Instruments: A cappella

First published: 1757 in Church Harmony Sacred to Devotion, p. 32

Description: A setting by Joseph Stephenson of a hymn for Whitsunday, from page 32 of his Church Harmony Sacred to Devotion. The first edition of this collection was published in 1757. Hymn Tune Index tune number 2659. The text is a Long Metre version of a text which had been widely used in the first half of the eighteenth century in a Common Metre form, beginning (according to the Hymn Tune Index) with the second edition of Henry Playford's The Divine Companion (1707).

External websites:

Original text and translations

English.png English text

He's come, let ev'ry knee be bent,
Let all our hearts new joy resume.
Let nations sing with one consent:
The promised Comforter is come.

No anxious thoughts molest our peace,
This day let all our grief retire;
Let ev'ry tear for ever cease,
And ev'ry doubtful thought expire.

Hail blessed spirit, not one soul,
But does thy pow'rful influence feel;
Thou dost our darling sins control,
And also fix our wav'ring zeal.

What greater gift, what greater love,
Can God on earth to man bestow?
'Tis half the angels' heav'n above,
And all our heav'n on earth below.